The Leviathan, The Two Treatises of Government, The Social Contract, The Constitution of Pennsylvania

The Leviathan (1651), The Two Treatises of Government (1689), The Social Contract (1762), The Constitution of Pennsylvania (1776) The Original Texts By Peter Kanzler This anthology of valuable texts is essential for anyone interested in politics, history, or philosophy. These are some of the most important books pertaining to the

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A Bible Not Borrowed from the Neighbors

Essays & Aphorisms on Egoism Edited by Kevin I. Slaughter   As with other titles published by Underworld Amusements, the book has an appealing aesthetic layout which complements the text nicely without overshadowing the content. Like many of the publications from Underworld Amusements this book, as the title suggests, concentrates on the

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What is a Rune?

What is a Rune? And Other Essays Collin Cleary   The premise of What is a Rune? is explained in the introduction. The book is an expansion on a topic the author previously wrote about in an essay entitled “Philosophical Notes on the Runes”. Cleary also explains that despite the title

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de Naturae Natura

A Study of Idealistic Conceptions of Nature and the Unconsciousness Alexander Jacob   As the title of the book suggests, the primary focus here is on Nature and the Unconscious, and also the value of epistemological methods in the study of these concepts. This is clearly stated at the beginning

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Nietzsche’s Coming God

Or the Redemption of the Divine Abir Taha   Author Abir Taha takes on one of the thorniest and most difficult aspects of Nietzsche’s philosophy – the religious dimension of his work concerning Nietzsche’s attitude towards Christianity, Judaism and Hellenic Paganism. The end result of this is a fascinating exegesis

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The Biocentric Worldview

Ludwig Klages   “Make no mistake: “progress” is the lust for power and nothing besides, and we must unmask it as a sick, destructive joke. Utilizing such pretexts as “necessity,” “economic development,” and “culture,” the final goal of “progress” is nothing less than the destruction of life. This destructive urge

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